Surrey SabbCast

SabbCast 006 The Rule of Six explained.

September 13, 2020 University of Surrey Students' Union Season 1 Episode 6
Surrey SabbCast
SabbCast 006 The Rule of Six explained.
Chapters
0:00
Introduction
2:42
The new "Rule of Six"
6:43
Student Accommodation larger than six
8:57
Club and Society socialising under the new law
13:24
Why now?
19:03
Closing Universities
24:52
How well is Surrey doing?
27:10
Sabbatical round up
Surrey SabbCast
SabbCast 006 The Rule of Six explained.
Sep 13, 2020 Season 1 Episode 6
University of Surrey Students' Union

This week the Sabbs are joined by Jim Dickinson, Associate Editor of Wonkhe
Jim talks us through the latest changes to the law, how that affects students as well as the brand new guidance from the Department of Education on how to reopen campuses. We cover households, socialising, Club and Society activities, and what might happen in the future.
As usual the Sabbs round up what they have been doing to represent students across the University as well as what they have been working.

If you would like to hear more about Higher Education policy and what is happening in Universities, you can subscribe to the Wonkhe show which is released every Friday

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

This week the Sabbs are joined by Jim Dickinson, Associate Editor of Wonkhe
Jim talks us through the latest changes to the law, how that affects students as well as the brand new guidance from the Department of Education on how to reopen campuses. We cover households, socialising, Club and Society activities, and what might happen in the future.
As usual the Sabbs round up what they have been doing to represent students across the University as well as what they have been working.

If you would like to hear more about Higher Education policy and what is happening in Universities, you can subscribe to the Wonkhe show which is released every Friday

Computer Generated Transcript

Welcome to the Surrey SabbCast 

Speaker 1 

News from the University of Surrey. Students Union all about your student life and what your elected officers have been doing for you this week, representing you across the University of Surrey. 

Speaker 1 

Find out more at www.ussu.co.uk or find us on Instagram and Facebook at Surry Union. 

Speaker 2 

Hello, I'm Lizzie Brodersen, your student union president and welcome to another so sorry subcaste. As usual I am joined by your union VPS. Theo, Izzy Maya an arrow. So this week the government announced new changes to the kovid laws. What is this all about? 

Speaker 1 

This week the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson announced changes to the law in response to the rising rate of covered infections in the UK. 

Speaker 1 

This law has been called the rule of six as no more than six people from different households are now allowed to socialize either indoors or outdoors. 

Speaker 1 

There are many exceptions, including universities and privately operated businesses, non-profit organisations and charities. 

Speaker 1 

The full text of the law has not yet been published, however, what was guidance is no enforceable by what can be up to a 10,000 pound fight. 

Speaker 1 

Also this week, the Department for Education has released extensive guidance for universities on how they believe it is best for them to reopen the campuses next week. 

Speaker 1 

The guidance is wide ranging and includes definition of tiers of online learning versus hybrid learning. 

Speaker 1 

The new law will come into effect on Monday, the 14th of September. 

Speaker 2 

This week I am really, really pleased to welcome Jim Dickinson, Associate editor at wonky. Jim writes and tweets extensively on universities. Ann is a longtime friend of the Students Union. You can also subscribe to the monkey show one key on your favorite podcast app, so Jim, thanks very much for joining us today. 

Speaker 2 

Please help us make sense of what's happening this. 

Speaker 3 

Week Oh yeah, I mean, if only um, none of it makes sense, that's it. I mean, that's part of the yeah look two or three weeks ago. You might remember that there was a kind of mild moral panic around the resurgence of raves. 

Speaker 3 

Um, you know, this was very exciting for some journalists, presumably because you know the last time they had fun in their lives when they attended a rave in the late 80s and the government introduced legislation that would kind of beef up the law around organizing a rave in order to stop viral transmission. Now we've actually, in truth. 

Speaker 3 

Had quite a good summer for COVID-19 and transmission. The numbers were going down even the launch of eat app to help out and so on. Went quite well. It's been quite good. The weather's been nice isn't it? And and so on and so on. But what's actually been happening over the past couple of weeks and very specifically in the areas that went into local lockdown? 

Speaker 3 

Is an increase in viral transmission very specifically amongst young people and one of the key causes of the increase in viral transmission has been household transmission, so that's people popping around each other's houses and then what happened towards the end of last week is that this started to reach. 

Speaker 3 

A point where a really significant number of additional new COVID-19 cases were being recorded in the stats and the stats showed that these were being recorded amongst young people, principally and affluent young people, specifically an, as various people have pointed out, not all students are. 

Speaker 3 

Affluent and young, but almost all people that are affluent and young are either about to be, are currently, or have just been students. So there's a link between students and this kind of rising covid cases, and so on. And where that gets us to really is if you asked anyone a few days ago what the current rules are, what the difference was between the law and the guidelines. What you could do in a house, what you could do outside. 

Speaker 3 

I can sell on if you asked 10 people, you'd get 10 different answers and it was highly likely that you wouldn't get the same answer for any of those people, and what you can't do coherently is run a mass migration of millions of people, students into new towns and cities and have that level of confusion. So really what the government's done this week is? 

Speaker 3 

Attempt to take steps to massively simplify everything, but taking a bunch of stuff that was in guidance. Sticking it into the law and attempting to make the law really clear and and what they're trying to do is, say, look you can't meet in groups of more than six in terms of people that don't live in your house. Now, obviously for students that has a moderately profound effect, 'cause If you're a returning student, that means you can only really go out with. 

Speaker 3 

You know five of your friends, unless there are more people that live in your house, that's you. Know one of the exemptions. And if you're a new student, you know it's it's going to be important for you to find ways to get on with the people that you live with and for us to get some clarity about what counts as a household. Depending on what type of property you may move into as a first year. If you're not a commuter student, but. 

Speaker 3 

But basically your top line here is the government is desperate to simplify things and say to people, look, you can do a bit of socializing. 

Speaker 3 

But you really can't do the large group socializing that perhaps lots of students are used to doing, particularly at the start of a term. 

Speaker 2 

You mentioned that Jim, Uh, a bit about. 

Speaker 2 

Obviously, it's groups of six, but I think we're coming from a lot of our students. Is that the groups of six? We're able to socialize. However, a lot of student flaps are flats of 14 flats of 12, so are they going to go out and be questioned even if they are still from the same household? Even if there's 14 of them sucked? For example by the Lake? 

Speaker 2 

Um, I think that's probably the biggest query that we, yeah, coming out of that in mind. 

Speaker 3 

Well, I mean no. I mean, it's a really good question and you know in some ways everyday to school day, right? One other things that's amazing is if you write down a letter guidelines, some of which kind of contradict each other. What you can say if you're a politician is, well, just use your common sense. If suddenly you convert those guidelines into the law. 

Speaker 3 

You can't do is say Oh yeah, the law contradicts. That's a bit of a problem. Usually common sense because you've got police out arresting people or finding people. You have to be much clearer. So one of the things that has happened this week in this kind of pre announcement from politicians that they kind of convert a bunch of this stuff into the law is suddenly that that gets quite hard and the reality is. 

Speaker 3 

The guidelines have said for weeks now that within a large block of say, halls of residence, you can have four or five how households and it, and you could define that slightly different ways depending on how you manage the holes. It might be people share a kitchen or people who share bathrooms or whatever. That's all a bit woolly. Probably 2 woolly for the law and what it means is that in terms of the law that we've seen so far, for instance, in the North and lockdowns. 

Speaker 3 

Holds of residents are exempt from definitions of households. Now technically, that means that if we go into this coming Monday with very similar legal framework, you can have 300 people in the halls of Residence who could go out with 299 other people because that's their household now. 

Speaker 3 

That's obviously not a good idea either. They're going to correct that in the law or they're going to say to whoever runs the halls we'd like you to implement a kind of disciplinary system that could cover that kind of behavior, because the law would find it difficult to, and we don't know where that will land yet. We don't know if that will be consistent across different types of wholesome presidents. We don't know if the university's own holes will be the same as any other. 

Speaker 3 

Types of holes and obviously really large hmos. Houses in multiple occupancy. Also are are an issue, so it's a really good question. We don't know the answer yet, although what we do know is that if nine people live in a student house, those nine people can go out, so that's where you can break the rule of six. It's just that this question about holes and what counts as a household within holes. 

Speaker 3 

Is yet to be fixed, but hopefully we'll find out in the next, you know, a couple of days. 

Speaker 2 

And I actually had a. 

Speaker 4 

Quick question, um, so I was looking at the guidance today and there was a section on minimizing the risk to students and it did say that tired at higher education providers should also are possible. Support students to socialize in covid secure environments. 

Speaker 4 

For example, campus bars, students union. But it also says that they should identify safer social activities for students, and they may want to do this in collaboration with the students union and so just just on that on the whole, socializing safely encoded manner. What are some potential ideas that you think students union can do that? For example, I'm I'm vice president of activity, so I obviously want my clubs insight as to. 

Speaker 4 

Engage with their members to socialize with their members, but how do we do that with the rule of 6? 

Speaker 3 

Yeah, well, I mean that's a really good point. Look, there's a great paradox here, which is if you say 2 largely young people, here's a bunch of very carefully controlled and very restrictive rules. One of the. 

Speaker 3 

Impacts that has is that you may well push stuff underground and off campus, so the classic would be if there's nowhere to eat on campus. People are still hungry, they'll go off campus and they will transmit the virus between each other in a cafe in the middle of Guilford. OK, so you have to take into account when you decide these things. They're sort of, you know, the The Downsides as well as the upsides of any. 

Speaker 3 

Any risk decision now generally what the government believes with good reason is that if you take out all of the opportunities for students to socialize on a campus, then you have that effect that I've kind of talked about an and So what they're saying is because universities are educational facilities. 

Speaker 3 

They are run by people who understand risk management and risk assessment and how to do social distancing and so on and so on. That University should be working with student unions and student groups to attempt to find ways for students to do safe, socially distanced activities. Now, here's the irreality right. 

Speaker 3 

Let's imagine that their days and I don't know if you got Disney Society, but you gotta Disney SoC that wants to meet in electric theater in a socially distanced way and watch one of the Disney Classics that will be pleasant, mildly social, fairly educational, in a kind of low level way. Everyone will be happy with that. 

Speaker 3 

And so on. If the Disney SoC gets on WhatsApp and says shadow all 50 of us go on a pub crawl, that's obviously a bad idea because there will be drunken breathing over each other. What no one really knows is what happens if they go to a film screening and then decide to go on a pub crawl, and so on and so on. So the intention. 

Speaker 3 

Is to attempt to provide moderately uncomfortable, but at least actual opportunities for students to socialize in a Safeway on campus, if you can make it work and it is a bit difficult 'cause they'll be a risk assessment and all that stuff. That's the intention. The reality is, if that if if none of that happens. 

Speaker 3 

Then you know people may either stay in their room on their own for a long time, or they are going to meet up illicitly, and they will transmit the virus. So the what the government is trying to do is try to lean on universities to say look, help us out a bit and provide some probably fairly awkward, but nevertheless better than nothing. 

Speaker 3 

Spaces and opportunities for students to do their thing in the hope that doing their thing is better than doing the other thing, which is probably more. 

Speaker 4 

Than you know I. I completely agree with that with that and I completely understand why they would do that. I mean, we we've had this discussion before with it with the other stabs about. I would rather know what they're doing, where they're doing that. They're doing, track and trace and then then, you know, going off campus and doing an activity and. 

Speaker 4 

Actually not appearing to any social distancing guidelines. My only worry was with the rule of six. Does that mean I can only do it with six people and that's sort of what my question was too, but I think you've clarified that formula is. 

Speaker 3 

That yeah and yeah and and the good news is what the government is saying is because the campus and the University is managed in theory in such a way as to. 

Speaker 3 

Um, you know, look after safety. You are allowed to break that rule of six in pursuit of it being on a low level basis. A moderately educational activity so you don't have to. If you take part in that kind of activity, stick to the rule of six. You can break. 

Speaker 4 

Them OK, I thought that's great to know. Thank you so much for clarifying that. I guess we'll be looking at a lot more organized events this year then for students. 

Speaker 5 

The thing I don't really understand though, is you know all of this stuff about skewness extends slightly is not include the rule of six in the socializing rules, but also from more of the educational point of view in the office of students and and so on. What I don't understand is that this is been a very predictable event. You know students were going to come back to to campuses. 

Speaker 5 

In September, and that's what it you know and less, they cancelled the whole thing and we didn't have, you know. And it was pretty, um, postponed until January or whatever, which they didn't do. Why they waited until the 11th hour to to deliver these guidelines? Any guns? I understand from an educational point of view, universities have not been provided with, uh, you know, is a sufficient guidelines as they would like if you compare it to say, you know schools. And in high school and. 

Speaker 3 

Other educational forms. Yeah, well, I mean it's a really good question. I mean, I, I'd say a few things. First is, I think it's fair to say that all of us thought in March this would be over in a few weeks. 

Speaker 5 

And I'll be over by Christmas this but. 

Speaker 3 

I don't know why we thought that 'cause all the evidence was there and Chris Witty was saying it won't be. But I think we sort of thought that. 

Speaker 3 

Right, I mean, there's still some people who think it will be all over. this Christmas will be. 

Speaker 4 

Financially, we sort of wanted it to be over so we all were. 

Speaker 3 

You know you want it to be over and then yeah, so I sort of get why there wasn't a lot of kind of that kind of Doomful Planning early on, but then you know the second thing is really, you've got two choices. You either turn around and say the whole term will be online. You don't need to come to Guildford or you say you can come to Guildford, it will just be very very different. 

Speaker 3 

Depending on the progress of the pandemic now there are really big upsides and Downsides to both of those are options. Yeah, now if you're about to come to as a returning student or a new student back to Guilford because Britain made the decision, we're going to go for students coming back to University. They'll be lots of social distancing, lots of it will be awkward. 

Speaker 3 

Quite difficult, a lot of the stuff will be online anyway, and so on. And you be thinking why on earth and I, you know why? Why have I come back for this? But the alternative would also have been pretty rotten. You know would have destroyed lots of local economies, would have meant that people didn't get to see each other. You know lots of people had a really rough time during the early part of the pandemic. In that lock down and missed each other. 

Speaker 3 

Lots of mental health problems and so on. So the reality is what the pandemic does is it generates pretty negative and Rotten Downsides on both options. If you like the the question is how do we all of known about some of the things that we're about to have to experience? You know on Cam personally in terms of this role of six and so on four or five weeks ago, would it have been easier to cope with in the next few weeks? 

Speaker 3 

And I think there's a reasonable argument that says yes, and the thing that relates to that is if the government and this is where I kind of get kind of personal and political. If the government had its act together on testing and have delivered the volume of testing with the speed of testing that it was promising in April, then there's no doubt that some of these restrictions around the number of people you can hang out with. 

Speaker 3 

Around the Lake and so on. They just wouldn't be as stringent, but because for whatever reason the testing stuff has gone wrong, we sort of are where we are and you know, you know there will be a public inquiry at some point that works out what went wrong on various aspects, including this failure to deliver testing, but there's no doubt that the intention was that by now, testing would all be sorted. 

Speaker 3 

And you know, as you have seen from the news. Sadly, for whatever reason, as of today, it just isn't. 

Speaker 5 

Yeah though, so do you think the the down the line as we get testing better, more up and running and better fleshed out then that will be when we start to see the the regulations and the the rules listed off a little bit. 

Speaker 3 

Oh, I mean look. 

Speaker 3 

If we were in a position where everyone in Britain was tested, I don't know. By some magic, you know, chip on their mobile phone every day so that you didn't have all the asymptomatic transmission that we do have. You know you can eradicate the virus pretty quickly, so this has always been about testing and for. 

Speaker 3 

You know, for students are big, problem is asymptomatic transmission. It's people who've got the virus. You don't know they've got the virus, or I've got very mild symptoms and and you don't go and get a test. So so look, you know, I guess one of my messages would be collectively we are going to get to that kind of promised land of lots of these things easing up. 

Speaker 3 

Faster if everyone plays it safe on having a fever and having a a dry cough and saying to themselves right? I better try and get a test and look right at the start of term. Now it's really hard to get a test. It's there. You know I'm talking to you on this podcast on the 10th of September. Really hard to get test today in seven days time. They may well have been able to ramp up testing. There may well be. 

Speaker 3 

You know a walking test facility somewhere in Guilford, and so on and so on, so you know as soon as testing ramps up, the faster that you know she didn't get tested. If they're worried that they might have the virus, you know the faster SoC is going to be able to get through this and and go back to something closer to normality, if not actual normality. 

Speaker 5 

Yeah, definitely you know. In terms of you know, being sensible about when you've got a cough and isolating yourself. 

Speaker 5 

You know that also extends generated the. You know being sensible about not going out with more than six people, and you know in all of this stuff in terms of how SoC and you know, Matt Hancock's mentioned it as well. About you know, young people being the problem and if we as students want to not only you know end this pandemic as soon as possible but also kind of remove a bit of that state where everyone's just gotta. 

Speaker 5 

You know, behave themselves and be sensible, really, and that's you know. Hopefully that's not gonna be too difficult, but that's the hope. 

Speaker 2 

Department of Education guidance talks about this tier system of higher education. 

Speaker 2 

I was just wondering if you could delve a little bit more into maybe what that means. What that would mean for students and what that means for kind of, you know. 

Speaker 3 

Sure, yeah, so so not what the government is. And I do remember that Nando system that Boris came up with that got dropped about 24 hours later with different colors. It's not dissimilar to that so it's 4 levels tier one tier 22324. So tier one is basically the status quo that we have now which is. 

Speaker 3 

Blended learning some face to face some online. Come on campus, it will be a bit awkward. That won't be much. There won't be many places to sit in the library, so that's kind of the status quo. Level 4 is you just shut the campus. Yeah, and you pretty much lock the whole thing down and so let what levels two and three do. 

Speaker 3 

These kind of get there slowly in terms of slowly canceling large chunks of face to face activity. Very much discouraging people from coming on campus and so on and so on. Now the difficulty is that what we don't know at this point is how bad an outbreak would have to get in order for public health officials. Locally in the Guilford area or nationally. 

Speaker 3 

To trigger a move from Tier 1 to tier two or tier two to three tier 3 and so on. Part of that will be because you know people have only started discussing these tears over the past few days. Part of it will be Guilford and the University of Surrey is a very different place and a very different University to lots of other universities, and the distribution of your buildings and how many students you have and. 

Speaker 3 

How many students use public transport? You know all those factors would come into play, so we might get a bit more clarity on that in the coming weeks, but broadly, what it's trying to say is it's not a binary, so it's not like in April where one minute everyone was in every lecture and then the next minute overnight. Everyone got an email saying, You know, it's. 

Speaker 3 

It's overall we were all going home, except you know, the the order number of security staff this time. What the government saying is they'll be 4 levels the level that everyone has been kind of told about now. And as I say, getting worse and worse until you get to level 4 where you know you've got, you know a complete lockdown. 

Speaker 3 

A complete lockdown of the campus and look. Hopefully you wouldn't get to a complete lockdown of the campus, because in the event of a small outbreak you can do the testing trace thing. You could workout then the main problem was in that person's flat or you know on their course or whatever, and you could avoid that kind of giant thing where you take the whole of the University of Surrey's campus and. 

Speaker 3 

You know you shut down Stack Hill. That would be, you know, be quite dramatic. So so the idea is to try to avoid that you know by by having a kind of a mini game of whack a mole within the giant whack a mole itself, which is Stack Hill. 

Speaker 2 

So Jim, in your opinion and just to kind of round off this section, what do you see in your crystal ball? 

Speaker 2 

What do you think semester ones going to like? 

Speaker 3 

One of the things I think that was quite seductive about the summer, so you know the sun's out, you know that it was actually quite nice summer, you know, in terms of the weather and all of that kind of stuff, is there was a sense that every day this got slowly easier and slowly more familiar and slowly better. And I think the scary thing about this term. 

Speaker 3 

Is this a sense that we're going in the reverse direction? 

Speaker 3 

What I think is true is unless and until we have a vaccine? We gotta live alongside this virus and living alongside a virus is hard because every time the government. Now I'm not saying the government does this very well or communicates it well. But every time the government invents or changes a rule. 

Speaker 3 

Half of Twitter, for example, says you've gone too far and the other half says you haven't gone far enough and and you know, depending on your kind of you know your politics and your view on the world, and you know whether your family have been affected and so on. You're either like I can't believe they're doing this or you're like, Oh my God. 

Speaker 3 

But I should have done this three weeks ago, so the establishment of this cliche that people talk about the new normal is going to take another while yet, and the trouble is this time it will take awhile as it starts to get darker everyday as it gets colder as everyone gets tired as people's assignments start to stack up and. 

Speaker 3 

And so on. 

Speaker 3 

So I think what will happen is if students are smart and do their level best to form alliances, some of which will be online. You know, with other students to build a little bit of kind of student solidarity. I think most students will get through the year. 

Speaker 3 

Just about together, I think some students will decide it's not for them and you know lots of people at all sorts of levels of the system. Both you know, kind of national politics and in in the University and so on. Need to find ways to make sure that we don't punish students who decide. It's not really for them, but in the end I think we will find a way to live alongside the virus. 

Speaker 3 

That just feels more natural. It won't be as easy and won't be as straightforward as getting on WhatsApp. And 15 people going to the pub, which is perhaps what people were doing six months ago. None of this will. It will continue to be a real hassle, really complicated, quite confusing, annoying, and so on. 

Speaker 3 

But eventually it will sort of get easier to cope with. I think if people have, you know, just a little bit of patience and a bit of solidarity for you, know each other's experiences over the next few months. As I say, as it gets colder and wetter, darker as Britain always does in the run up to Christmas. 

Speaker 5 

Sorry, I know Leslie said we're wrapping up this section, but I just want to add one more cheeky question if that's OK, sure, and that is so, you know, in terms of dealing with all of this, you know pandemic stuff. How do you think Siri is stacking up against other universities in comparison? 

Speaker 3 

Well, look, uh, I think what I'd say is every University has really, really struggled. 

Speaker 3 

Want to know what the current guidance is and what the current position is in say testing or what you know they're being asked to? Do you know in terms of, you know, incorporating some of this stuff into their practice, and then you know as a result when you combine that with the real AT which is most universities do today what they did yesterday and most universities did yesterday what they did the day before, so. 

Speaker 3 

You know, we get universities don't change rapidly. Very often. Surrey is like most universities it has on one level struggled to have the clarity in itself to work out what it's doing and then to be able to communicate that clarity to students. So are there universities that have been better at communicating the changes and what timetables will look like and so on. 

Speaker 3 

Probably are there ones that have been much, much worse. Probably what's important. I think a University like sorry campus based University is if you assume that the University is partly a service provider in exchange for fees, but also partly a community of kind of academics and students. 

Speaker 3 

Finding ways to establish some of these kind of norms and practices and so on amongst the community becomes really, really important. And what that's about is the University is getting it wrong or isn't clear or he's doing something Daft. It's about students raising that and saying something about it rather than just kind of moaning to each other on WhatsApp or whatever. 

Speaker 3 

Because it's it's it's assertive students. Over the next few months that are both going to improve the experience for themselves and their colleagues, but also improve the practice of universities in the next two or three months. 

Speaker 2 

Thank you very much, Jim, and thank you for joining us in this podcast. I think we've been able to give a really, really good insight into. 

Speaker 2 

A little bit more of what the government announced, and I know that our students will be very grateful. So thank you very much. 

Speaker 3 

Pleasure besta luck everyone besta luck thank. 

Speaker 5 

You very much Jim. 

Speaker 2 

So a huge thank you to Jim from monkey to come for coming onto the podcast to have a chat as normal. Now we're going to hear from your VP's on your Subs about what they've been up to this week. Um, how the people representing you as students and what projects they have been up to to look to the future. So VPN's, I will hand over to you so. 

Speaker 6 

This week I have been in a couple of meetings, particularly looking at Accessibility, Accessibility on campus, and Accessibility in lectures. Um, so Theo and I, in fact both had a meeting with Accessibility on campus, particularly looking at doing stuff like if we can get swipe access to our CD, or whether we can watch the possibility of making the. 

Speaker 6 

Ampitheatre, which is the section between the hive and the nest just outside of Lt. Whether we can potentially get more ramps and more access through there. So yeah, I think we had a really good discussion about that and then looking at lecture Accessibility I've been working with the University to provide. 

Speaker 6 

Slides are off white so that they are more accessible to students, particularly students like myself who are dyslexic. I always found it really hard to read when you had a right weight side contrasting with the black text. Other than that, it's just been sort of catching up with center well being and. 

Speaker 6 

Organizing covert support. 

Speaker 5 

Yeah, so I've been doing a lot of things as well as with Aaron. We've had a couple of meetings that, uh, together we did. As I mentioned, we did, um, a big session with the center of well being and then talk about how they're changing their. 

Speaker 5 

Process slightly so that was really interesting. We also had a meeting about campus Accessibility and signage. Also, as per every week, I always talk about we've been doing a lot of uni, two things in the voice zone and working mainly on the branding and the training this week, so that's been a take up a lot of my time. Bit of Black History Month planning coming on. 'cause That's coming up soon. 

Speaker 5 

Just finishing off the task touches to the role descriptor for the academic SOC's course Rep, um liaison officer role that I've been sorting out, so that's been really good. Had a meeting with the summer, the vice Provost of Education, so that was also talking about mainly those sort of things you need to and, um, demik SOC's. 

Speaker 5 

And today we had media training, which was all quite exciting, so we all had to do mock interviews and things that was quite scary meeting with them. 

Speaker 5 

Post grad reps and talk about with them and then tomorrow we're all on an away day, so that's what I've been doing. 

Speaker 4 

Well, this week has been such a busy week. I'm sure all of you can agree with me. I think all of us looking at freshers coming in so soon and just under 2 weeks everyone's really stressed out. So my meetings have been definitely quite stressful. I've had covered officer meetings this week to get sports clubs and societies trained up so that they can. 

Speaker 4 

Continue their activity in a in a safe manner. I've had the sports standing and the other day which we presented. You know all the necessary coverage measures that we're taking. We've also introduced, um. 

Speaker 2 

Um? 

Speaker 4 

Well being champions. To them we we've touched on that we went through any of their questions and concerns. We had a consultation with SOC's and the other day about how they felt about covert officers. Seeing as it's not a compulsory position, we've had really really good feedback on that and I'm really, really glad that we've had about 400 people sign up and I think that's What Car is said to me today. I've got the. 

Speaker 4 

Site is standing tomorrow afternoon. Way day. I had a case of prod case um yesterday and we've done some Black History Month planning altogether. All the steps were in that meeting along with some of the Zonies we have SoC notification today. So yeah, it's it's been such a busy week and this is just half the things I'm looking at my calendar right now and this is just half the things on it so. 

Speaker 4 

Yeah, really, really. Looking forward to welcoming the freshers. It's a lot of work but hopefully when you guys are all there you'll see everything and hopefully you'll be really happy with all the plans and the projects that we've been up to. 

Speaker 7 

I've been doing a lot of work around freshers week so we announced on last week's podcast. Our plans for a pub Rubik's and hopefully also entertainment at the Lake. 

Speaker 7 

I know some students may be wondering if anything has changed following Boris Johnson's announcement, but everything we had planned for pub rubik's on the Lake is within what is current guidance, but from next week will be law. So the law of six will be adhered to in both venues table and Rubik's will be for groups of up to six and picket tables at the Lake. 

Speaker 7 

Um, in the hopes it just go ahead will be for groups of up to six as well. So everything we have planned is still well within the door and I hope that will reassure students that we're still working really hard to provide them with entertainment and a place to socialize during freshers week so. 

Speaker 2 

Thank you all. You guys have been super super busy this week. 

Speaker 2 

Um, sorry for me. A couple of things I've been up to this week, so I was sat on a disciplinary panel on Tuesday. Um, so in previous podcast is talked a little bit about what they are and actually something came out of that through just feedback and things I've actually said, OK, we need to talk to the University and change that. So we're going to hopefully take that forward. 

Speaker 2 

Um, we had our 2nd St media consultation, so this is a chance for the unit and the University to talk to the street medias an for them to hold us to account and us for also to ask them questions and which things were going really, really well. This one was all around freshers and freshers week and how they can get involved had a meeting around my sorry. 

Speaker 2 

So how that is developing a new get involved hub or my sorry so attended that with Mya and Jody are activities coordinator um learning and teaching meeting that happens every week. That one really looked around. How we? 

Speaker 2 

Ensuring that SOC's are being kept safe, which is a really really positive thing, something super exciting that was released this week, is that warden fine proposal has been approved and gone out my social medias so this is something that was one of my manifesto pledges and I'm really, really proud to be able to say it's happened. 

Speaker 2 

So from now, first offence would find won't happen on campus in accommodation. There are exceptions, for example tampering with fire equipment on all the use of class B&C drugs. But the whole premise of this is that students will have the chance to go on an education course before. 

Speaker 2 

Potentially means pay a fine and if they go in this course then they don't have to pay the fine. So it's all about educating students rather than just slapping a big fine on them and then the final thing that a lot of students would have seen is we publish the letter that was sent to maximum from the students union and from myself all around the NSS that's picked up. 

Speaker 2 

A lot of traction which is really, really positive. I know it's added a lot of interactions on my social media, so please if you do have any recommendations or questions following that, please don't hesitate to get in contact. But that's the level of pressure that we're continuing to put on the University to make sure that your student satisfaction stays at the forefront. 

Speaker 2 

In terms of a couple of projects, is he mentioned about fresh? Is the whole union, sabbatical officers and full time staff have been working really, really hard behind the scenes to make that happen? But also something else exciting and actually just before this podcast recording and we had a chat about a cultural calendar that again was on my manifesto, but also. 

Speaker 2 

Run some of the community teams manifestos as well, which is a really exciting project. We're hoping to introduce in the next couple of weeks and months, so that's everything from your sabbatical team this week. So a huge thank you again to my VPS for working so hard this week and we will see you next week at the next. Sorry, subcaste. 

 

Introduction
The new "Rule of Six"
Student Accommodation larger than six
Club and Society socialising under the new law
Why now?
Closing Universities
How well is Surrey doing?
Sabbatical round up