Surrey SabbCast

Student led support special

March 04, 2021 University of Surrey Students' Union Season 1 Episode 21
Surrey SabbCast
Student led support special
Chapters
Surrey SabbCast
Student led support special
Mar 04, 2021 Season 1 Episode 21
University of Surrey Students' Union

This week, VP Support Aaron Seabrook chats to committee members from Nightline, Welfare Watch, and Student Minds. There are great hints, tips, and advice on how to deal with stress, motivation, and student life

Show Notes Transcript

This week, VP Support Aaron Seabrook chats to committee members from Nightline, Welfare Watch, and Student Minds. There are great hints, tips, and advice on how to deal with stress, motivation, and student life

Welcome to the sorry, sopcast news from the University of Surrey Students Union, all about your student life and what your elected officers have been doing for you this week, representing you across the University of Surrey. Find out more@www.usu.co.uk or find us on Instagram and Facebook at Sarah union. Hello, and welcome, everyone. So this week on our sub cast, we have a support zone services coming with us to talk about University Mental Health Awareness Day, and results days, which are coming up this week. So I'll introduce our members to you now. Liam, would you like to start? Yes, hello, my name is Liam, and I am a coordinator for saris nightline service. Hi, I'm Ellie, and I'm one of the coordinators for student lines. Hi, I'm Kat. I'm one of the other coordinators for sorry, nightline. And I'm also a coordinator for student minds. Hi, I'm Harriet, and I'm the president of welfare watch. So one of the big things we're going to start off with first is results day coming up something that I know is quite scary for everyone. And, and is a big pressure time for sort of all students throughout whatever year you're in to how how do you all feel about sort of results day in particularly, there's this clash? That's classic thing about the pressures. I think there's Leah, like you said, quite a lot of pressure. Like today I've even had messages because about kind of results. And it's kind of people asking how it should the refeeding. And it's already, although results come out tomorrow. Very much like people already asking how you're doing. And there's quite a lot of pressure to talk about it. Which can feel quite scary. Yeah, I think like one of the hardest parts around results day is, as you said, like the pressure to talk about it. And like, you almost feel like you always have to tell like certain friends and stuff. And it's almost kind of expected that people are going to ask you about what you got. And which I think is one of the worst parts about it. I think, yeah, I think the the telling friends does often feel rather awkward in terms of you never know whether it's a gloat or whether it's like a, oh, I haven't done so well. It's always a bit of a uncomfortable situation, especially I think, as well that this year has been so significantly different again, and the students in terms of you know, it's been another year of online exams, which is always different. You always have at the end of an exam, when you sit it in school that you come out and you discuss with your mates and that and be like, Oh, how did that go? Obviously, there's a little less of that during actual exams. And now you have the same thing was for results day in terms of obviously with the services like particularly cat and laying with foot from nightline. And how do you find that is the pressure results, something that is often reflected on students and their, their their well being? Definitely, I feel like it's a thing that a lot of people have this even when it's not result state academics as such, the thing that so many people talk about. And with a pandemic, sometimes you don't have as many social connections, and they don't talk about other things. And it can be the kind of thing where you're in an echo chamber where the only thing we talk about is work and results. And the thing you have to remember is to try and listen to people try and not have to one up each other and just making sure you're there. Yeah, I fully agree. And I think for me, I've had a bit of a different experience where I was on placement last year. So it's the same as most final years. But this is the first time I've experienced online exams, and personally. So it's a really different format for me. And so like you were saying, Aaron about kind of coming out of an exam and having that conversation, I've not been able to have that. And then when you have had that it's kind of overtaxed and things get misconstrued, and it's just not, it's just not the same. And I think that's definitely reflected in kind of what other students feel as well. I think I have a note for that as sort of just experiences. How are you feeling for your results? Personally, very nervous. But again, because I'm finally Yeah, I've got quite a lot riding on this, especially, hopefully with the safety net, it means that things can would be good if I did well. But I just don't know how I've done I find that helpful as well. And that sort of in keeping in track where I've been looking at the safety net is sort of my baseline and can't get any worse than this. No matter how do ya just been telling myself but can only go up from here. Yeah, the safety net is certainly a is a great help. But do you find that overseas, a lot of students Cuz I remember when I had that when we were looking at the safety net last year, it was just sort of done unannounced to us without previous year. So it didn't really have to, it wasn't something I had to worry about. I just knew that because of the way I did first semester, how do you feel like do you think that's going to add even more pressure to students and more uncomfortable about this for coming results day, I know for some of my friends, especially those who were say, on placement last year, and so haven't really been in online exams, there is quite a lot of pressure on this set of exams, because obviously, these are sort of the basis for your safety net. And so if you don't do as well as you were hoping, and sort of your your second semester is then even more stressful than it maybe would have been, if the safety net from certain modules and things like that hadn't already been put in place like it was for some people last year. I definitely reflects that, and how my a lot of my friends are feeling as well hurry it is that it's something because when we were on placement we've experienced before, so there is a level of stress around kind of? Well, I know, it's great that I can't do any worse at this. But at the same time, if I don't do as well as I'd hoped, I've got to work really, really hard. Next semester anyway. Yeah, I know a lot of people have the feeling that even though first semester is sort of slightly different than second semester, you are still currently working through a pandemic, you do still have sort of the stresses that come with online learning and things like that. So then, even though, you know, it will mean that your second semester should hopefully be slightly less stressful. Your first semester is still just as stressful as it would be if not, you know, maybe a little bit more because you're working through a pandemic, and also your grades for second semester are then dependent on on these grades. Yeah, I completely agree that sort of front loading of the stress can definitely be an impact. And it's certainly interesting to sort of hear what you guys have said there. And I don't know, I think from a, obviously now not a student's perspective, but within the thinking of June, I think I'd find it somewhat uncomfortable to know that it was for coming that this, as you said, it adds more pressure to your first semester, regardless of what it takes away from your second semester. And like, there is a there is a side that Fingers crossed, hopefully everyone has done well. So one of the things obviously, Harriet, you sort of alluded to there is obviously in the case where you do, unfortunately, get the results that you're not sort of wanting that, obviously as well being services. And well. How do you? What would you What would you best say to students for their best methods to cope with poros like results that they didn't want, I know that it varies from person to person. But for me, at the very least, even if it's something, I've got several socks, I don't like, I kind of want to talk about it, to think it through. I feel like for me and maybe other people, if I keep it in my head, I make things so much worse, there needs to be I catastrophize it. And if I talk to someone, a friend, and they're willing to listen to me, we can talk it over. And I can find out that, you know, perhaps things aren't quite as bad as I'm playing them to be in my head. And then we can talk about something else. And then I realise, oh, well actually, maybe I didn't get what I wanted, but the rest of my life can still go on. It's not the end of everything. I think the important that like talking to a friend, but also kind of talking to a stranger can also be really helpful in that sense as well. Because often, if you're talking to friends, they've had the results the same day. And there's almost like the element of comparison. Whereas I think I found in the past, like talking to someone who hasn't had results day, or something I didn't know has been really, really useful. And I guess that's where services like nightline or the Samaritans would come in, because it's talking to someone who's kind of an outsider's perspective and isn't trying to say, Oh, well, it's okay. Because if you're not feeling okay, then that's alright as well. 100%. I know for me personally last year, so the majority of my sort of closest friends were on placement. And so I sort of felt that it was more comfortable talking to them about grades and things like that, because they didn't, they haven't just got their grades back and they were sort of sort of separate to it. So I completely agree with this sort of talking to a stranger can sometimes make you feel loads better about it. Because I know obviously like we said before with sort of sharing your results not sharing them. Sometimes it can, you can feel very overwhelmed with either that you should be sharing them or if you do share them and it's maybe not the response she wanted that can sometimes feel awful. I know. Either. You have a great that you're not happy with and that someone else says that they also have agreed they're not happy with but it's actually a A lot higher than yours that can make you feel really bad about your own grades. And so I feel like if we were to take away the sort of ABA guarantee to share your results and things like that, and I know me and my friends tend to go with the, are you happy with your results or not? Not necessarily that you know, what grades did you get? But are you happy with them? Is there a thing you want to talk about with them? If you go down those routes? When talking to friends, it's sort of a lot more of a comfortable conversation, as opposed to what grades did you get? And let me figure out whether I got higher or lower and things like that? Yeah, I think it's really cool. I think one of the things I reflect on about that is like, the pressure that UC students can put on themselves to get there first. And then when they don't, obviously, there's a lot of decisiveness. And do you think as well, because I think one of the things that really helped me was talking to people outside, as you said, talking to strangers, that sometimes talk to people within the sort of failed or roughly within the field that you want to go into, about what they think about the university grades, because I know one of the things that particularly from the engineering perspective is that, you know, first and the two one isn't, there's not much care for the difference. It's more so the experiences you build around. And so how do you guys feel about this? Obviously, we've got a lot of psychology students here and obviously Hurry up being a fellow engineer. How do you go through with that? I definitely agree. And that's been part of the conversation around great boundaries for, say, clinical psychology programmes, where there's been a lot of conversation about how your marks in a second module don't determine how good you are at listening, or empathising, or being there for people. And so yeah, your your results are determined by a lot of factors beyond your competency. Yeah, I think that's such a lovely way of saying it as well, because it comes back to this whole idea as well that, you know, your grade isn't the only thing that makes you employable, and likeable to companies, it's that whole, you know, how do you measure something like empathy on as a grade, but that's something that is such a soft skill to people. And such a great asset to have to, when you go forward in life to be able to relate to people I know, for me, personally, I so I'm on placement at the moment, but I last year, restart my second year. And obviously, most people when they reset, they reset due to grades. And I know when you feel like you have a bad grade. And you know, sometimes you do just have really bad grades in a certain module, if you maybe didn't, you know, who liked the way it's taught, or you just couldn't understand it, because some things are really hard. You can feel like this, you know, there's nothing else going for you that, you know, if you're bad at academics, or you're bad at certain modules that, you know, that's it, you're never going to succeed in any field, and it can feel like the end of the world. But like he said, those aren't the only skills that make you employable. And you especially if you then have to reset modules, if you have to reset an entire year. I know what two people do it, like, I know when I sort of had my results and felt like I was the only one that had to do it. And then find out that actually, like three of my friends were resetting as well. And so you feel a lot less sort of alone. But also, you then realise, oh, even these grades aren't the only things that that matter. And I know for me, I'm currently on a placement doing something that I really like in getting loads of skills from. And that is sort of completely irrelevant to the grades that I got. And you know, if you do get bad grades, they're not the only thing that are going to help you get where you want to be in your life. Yeah, I really want to second that. When I was doing my a levels, I had to reset. For me, it really felt like the end of the world, like completely felt like the end of the world. But I made it to uni, I came out of college with some really good a levels. And I'm now kind of in my final year. And I've it's taught me to put less pressure on my results. Because if I have to redo it, I have to redo it. And that although financially is a bit of a nightmare sometimes is it's not the end of the world. Yeah, I think as well, what you've sort of just mentioned Erica, as I myself, I as I said I have retook a year 13 and which is slightly strange one to do. But I thought it massively helped me out in terms of, you know, got me to where I wanted, obviously, I was unhappy at the time, but Well, that's what about that feeling of guilt then that students get when they retake you both kind of mentioned it there. How would you say is a way to sort of combat that and to realise that, you know, it's obviously you could say the same thing, but it's not really the end of the world. How would you encourage students to think differently about retaking? I think for me, the one thing that I did and the one thing I struggle with most is that my friends are moving on, and I wasn't. And that was really hard for me. So I got really stuck into kind of lots of extracurricular stuff. And it was a way that I made lots of new friends. And this was Back at college, but yeah, I think making sure you've got a good friendship group good support group around you is really important. So no matter whether kind of your friends have moved on gonna go on placement are have graduated it. Yeah, building that group around you is important. Yeah, really second, I think that not only is it having people around you, but it's also looking after your own mental perspective of things. I had to retake my first year exams. And I actually spoke to people about this about their experiences, resetting things. And there's a common thread I found where people reframe it as you're resetting because you failed, and you're back to square one. But actually, you've still got all the experience you've had getting to where you are. And just because you may be resisting the exams, it doesn't mean you've lost all the progress. If anything, you're more prepared than you ever were before. And everything you do is bettering yourself improving yourself, and still lets you pursue all the things you want to enjoy. Well, I really think that, yeah, that that mental framing of your mind, I think has really taken a message. There have not that was spotted. That was a really good way to word it. And I really hope that sort of hits home with that the shoes lesson. So I'm gonna I'm gonna move on, obviously now to talk about University mental health awareness day as I feel it's the right time to. So one of the things that I like to ask you about is how do you like, what do you do to Look after yourselves is this is an extremely important thing to do, obviously, especially after results day and everything, and how do you guys kind of yourselves. So I think for me, it's like trying to find the balance between like, and like sharing my results, and like, you know, really kind of, like coming to terms with them. And then also like, doing stuff to kind of almost take my mind off them and like distract myself from it. So like, when that's kind of doing, like, hobbies that I enjoy, or like exercising, like stuff like that, that's actually like practical, and like, will definitely make me feel better, like stuff that I know, improves my mood. And so for me, particularly, I started running like a few years ago, and that's like something that is just always been like a consistent thing that I know will always improve my mood. So I think it's just about like, trying to find stuff that you know, it's kind of like a foolproof way of improving your mood. And like, actually, towards your results, I think, um, yeah, hobbies is something that I find really important. And I really overlooked and I've gotten to crochet, and really start enjoying that because I normally do quite a lot of sport, I play lacrosse, at uni. And that's great for mental health. But at the moment, obviously, because we've had to stop playing because it's a team sport and all that because of COVID actually doing kind of things I can do at home, like paint by numbers, as well as something I've been doing a lot. And just constantly a bit creative and a bit mindful so that even if I'm watching TV or something, I'm not also scrolling through my phone and getting a bit of a break from social media as well. Yeah, just a second that I also crochet. And I think it's just like, it's like one of the best things you can do like for, like you say, like, while watching TV or listening to music, like it's just so good to be doing something like with your hands and it's practical, and that you get something out of it when you finish like you get like either like a blanket or like, like, you can pretty much crochet anything. And I feel like it's such a nice way to kind of create something whilst also relaxing, to try and not take offence to the fact that I haven't received anything. Okay? Where's the merge cat early, where's the bacon, I'm really not that talented. I know I do something quite some I don't quite crochet I bake a lot, which for me, obviously you do get the reward at the end of it, have you break something and you can then eat it. And but I think for me, because I tend to bake things that I really need to focus on and I really need to think about. And so if you've had either a stressful day or you've had a bad result or something like that, I will then just decide to make something because your mind then can't really think of anything else when it's trying to remember a massive list of ingredients and things like that. And so you then have sort of a set period of time when you really have to focus on something so that usually by the end of that time, I've probably forgotten what I was so stressed about I might you know, remember it later and maybe I've stressed about it then but for the time being you can really move your focus onto something else and and then at the end of it, you have Yeah, luckily, baked goods in my house makes don't seem to mind. So honestly, yeah, following a really complex recipe is so good. I like cooking more than baking. But I made this unbelievably complex Thai soup back when I was still living at home. And it took me like two and a half hours. But it really just got my mind out of everything. I was just thinking about the soup. It was really great. At the end, I was well proud of myself. So unfortunately, I don't follow in the baking scale. I think I would follow in the more sort of, I don't know if any of you watched James a caster when he did the. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, I think I've added up more cooks than the baking. I think that's such important to say, if I can just touch on that you don't have to be good at what you do. In anything you do. It doesn't have to be you don't have to be an expert in crocheting, or baking or cooking. The water that is what you're putting in. Not necessarily what you get. Obviously, it's nice if you have like a massive cake at the end, which you can pick out and feed everyone in your house. But you don't even have to get too caught up in the end goal. It's just enjoying the destination enjoying the journey rather than the destination. limb. You never fail to amaze me with your whiteness. I mean, I'm just like, you're so wise. Right? Yeah. Not real fake. Never been disappointed by anything in space, which is your The only compliment you're getting from me. Yeah, Liam is on nightline in house Baker. Yeah, that was that was a lovely, lovely way of phrasing it. Yeah, I'm sure I'm sure everyone likes my journey to burning, too. I melted the wires the kettle once as well as how it moved his way onto the stove, completely by accident. Well, obviously, On another note, as well, you're all part of societies are all running societies. And this year has certainly been different. And adds its challenges to doing this. How have you been coping with doing this? Obviously, I know, it's been a certainly a bit of a different one for welfare watch. Yeah, it's not sort of your usual running of a society. For those who don't know, we can't run welfare watch at the moment. And because Rubiks isn't open. And so before locked down, it was great. You know, sort of over summer, we planned sort of loads of things for when we came back and with you know, rubix lounge and the marquee and and we obviously had freshers week as well. And I think for me, obviously pre lockdown when we did, you know, need welfare watch. And the most important thing when when running, it was having a really good committee. So our committee is relatively new, we sort of only started beginning of last summer. And, and I think being able to have enough people that you're never having to take on too much. And you're never having to do everything all by yourself, because there's always going to be either someone else that can help you or someone else whose job it is to do that one specific thing, and really helps. And then you also in that you can always be really honest with people about, hey, I've got a deadline on this day. So I'm really not gonna be able to make this meeting or, you know, I've set out to do this task. But actually, at the moment, I've got a lot on my plate, and I can't and then we will be able to really pick up the slack with other people. And so it really helped having lots of people on the committee, that that nothing felt too overwhelming and nothing felt like it was getting too much when you're running things. Yeah, I think Harry, you touched on something really important there. And it's kind of asking for support when you need it. And that's something kind of we've always instilled in our committee, and also our volunteers at nightline is that if you can't do anything, we're not going to be mad. Just let us know if you need any help. And if we can support you. Yeah, it's something that we as a community, and especially as code so we've done quite a lot this year has just been saying, Oh, hey, things are a bit tough at the moment. Would you guys mind picking up on this? Or I'm going to take a week away? Is that okay? That sort of thing. And I know Liam has been absolutely wonderful with it. And so the rest of our committee so yeah, taking a step back and having a break when you need it is so so important. Because at the end of the day, you've got to put yourself first even if you're running a support service. The only reason why I found okay is because I know that their support resources available when I need them. And this year is hard for reasons beyond just studying at the same time as running a society or support service. I found myself in a position last month where I sort of needed to take a step back from being support code, student minds. And I found it really great that there were structures in place that I can feel comfortable enough, asking for a break or asking or just being able to take a step back when I needed it. And say, Yeah, it's definitely been helpful. I was just gonna say, I think it's important to kind of note that you also run the rotor, alongside another volunteer for nightline. So you are so busy, and you're probably one of the busiest people I've ever met muskan. And you're in your final year doing psychology as well. And I just, I don't know how you do it. I honestly don't I'm, I'm really amazed, by the way you do it. And to be fair, you are all amazing as well. Oh, Aaron, takes two to tango. I mean, I know, I know, in terms of of z, as you said, you feel comfortable taking a step back, we do have some of I would say, the most amazing people here in terms of the loveliest society so like, and, like I know, at times that you do get the pressure of societies to like that you do need to step back. So like hearing you guys say how welcoming is that? is certainly amazing to hear. Because being a president of the society before, it's, it can be really hard when you just want to take a bit of a break. But hearing members of the society say yeah, no, it's fine. And I think it's important for other societies to think about that as well. So I've been on committees for lacrosse before and it was it. I don't know, because I think we're a support service. And it's very much within our like nightline kind of mindset that take a break when you need it. But maybe within other societies, it's not as kind of like, yeah, take a break, you know. And I think if I were running another society now, it's something that maybe I would think more about, and kind of putting it in, like the kind of ground rules when starting a new committee, I think that's really good to echo. And I think as well, particularly the start of next year, will be very different, again, for societies and clubs. I think that's a great ground rule to try and catch in early. And to get the adapting going. I mean, you're going to have a load of first years, you want to take part in anything going for committee positions, they might not know the ins and outs that the previous year's run. So yeah, cat, what a brilliant idea. And so one of the things we all sort of mentioned about beforehand was getting you all to bring a question to ask each other. Do you have your questions? Who would like to go first? I've also distribute. So this one is most was the student minds, people. Because I know in your sessions, you talk quite a lot about, you know, things like structuring the day, and how to deal with news and that kind of thing. has ever been anything put up that one of you have listened to for all? I'd really like to do that? Yeah, certainly. So student minds functions as sort of well, now online peer support groups where students University experiencing new difficulties or low mood can sort of have a safe space to share what's on their mind and work together or to find ways of coping with it. And sort of the premise of the programme is that we're in a better position to understand each other simply because we're all students. And there is quite a bit of a shared experience here. And there are definitely been times in sessions where someone's given advice that a lot of people in the room have found helpful, whether that's in terms of self care, or Yeah, dealing with the low mood day. And I don't think I'm breaking confidentiality, if I say this, but something someone recommended was, if you really need to get something done, like clean your room, but you're struggling to find the motivation for it, set a timer. Just do it for five or 10 minutes. And then if at the end of those five or 10 minutes, you don't feel like continuing, you've still made some progress. But at the end of the if there's five or 10 minutes, sometimes you might find that you do have the motivation to go on. But either way, you've gotten something done. And that is something that a lot of people in the group did find that they did find intriguing and decided they would try. I don't know if they did, but yeah, I've been given that piece of advice before and it honestly changed the way I do things. Like completely I find need to clean my room, or cleaning the kitchen or whatever. I'll set a timer for 15 minutes and just see how much I can get done in that time. Especially if I'm having a bad day. I just find it so so useful, something that I found useful for running the session. This is this isn't necessarily something that like someone themselves as, as a member of the group, but as part of the structure of the course. And at the end of each session, we set up like implementation intentions, which is like basically just writing down a sentence of something practical that you're going to take from the session and put it into your, and we can try to kind of incorporate that into our life. And I find that like, I find myself doing this now, like, whenever I like, sit down and try and plan out my next week, like I always think, oh, what's one thing? Like one really small thing that I can find next week, like, oh, waking up half an hour early or whatever. And it's something I've never really thought of doing on a weekly basis before. But since I'm getting involved with Jude wise, like, it's really like change the way I kind of incorporate new habits into my cat, you sounded really energetic? When I said about the question, what was your question? I think that's just me a bit enthusiastic about everything. Kind of for hairier about a welfare watch, because I feel like I don't know huge amounts about welfare watch. And I'd like to know a bit more. So in terms of once the pandemic is over, what is it that you, yourself, and maybe kind of your peers at welfare watch, most looking forward to once the pandemics over? It's gonna sound very weird, I think I'm most looking forward to having people throw up on me, like that is not actually enjoying it. But that is a symbol of every single welfare watch shift that you do. Because our main role is to give people a sort of a safe place to sober up whether that is because they've drank too much, whether they've been kicked out of rubix, or not let in or whether, you know, they've just had a bad day, and they've lost their friends that rubix, things like that. But something that you will see every single shift without fail, is people throwing up. And, and I know we, you know, on the committee, we've made jokes about the fact that we're gonna have to do sort of a bulk order of sick balls in preparation for June 21. And I think as much as it's a sort of a weird thing, we are quite excited to get back into to be able to help more people, because I think you don't usually realise just how many people sort of end up in those positions on a night out, I know, sort of during my first and second year, I had a lot of friends and housemates who would just sort of be left by themselves or left sort of in the care of those who were house made some friends who maybe weren't, you know, trained to look after them in certain situations. And because if you are too drunk to get let in sort of, you know, there's only so much that security can help you with it. So you know, in terms of bounces that Rubik's, and I think that's where we that's where we come in, and hopefully can can provide people a place to get as much help as we possibly can on that night before they can maybe meet their friends and they can get taxi home and things like that. I tell you what, that's not the answer I was expecting. What will he say? and welfare, what's your drunken daycare for the students? Right, well, I'm conscious of time and obviously wrapping up. And obviously, we've just had a lovely plug there sort of, well for watch, but for I want to give you all the opportunity to Harriet, do you want to just go one last time, sort of tell us obviously, if you wanted to say again, what you sort of do, but go through the services? Yeah, so um, welfare watch. It's a sort of union service. It's run by entirely student volunteers. And were mainly there to help you on nights out. Like I said, it rubix obviously, pre third lockdown, it was at Rubiks lounge and also at the marquee as well. And so basically anywhere on campus where you can access alcohol or you can have a night out things like that we're there to help you, we usually get based in the front rooms, so you have a more quiet space to relax and sort of chill out from being in such a busy space like Rubik's and whether if you are, whether you're drunk, whether you feel ill like I said, whether you've been kicked out or whether you just need someone to relax and wait for your friends if maybe they want an extra half an hour, but you don't want to walk home alone and see some street lights on out in Guilford. So it can be sort of daunting. And that is where we come in with like I said student volunteers and so our volunteers will usually be in pairs and they will help with after you have a conversation with your sick will hold your hair back do anything you really need us to, you know, get you some water just so that you can sober up and then feel well enough to to go on your way without being more vulnerable. Amazing. Thank you Harriet La Jolla. Tell us about positive minds. Yep. So positive mindset peer support group led by trained student volunteers, like as Miss content earlier. And, you know, like we think that students are, like, best helped by other students in most cases and and so tries to help you conversations about like different topics of university life and to help if you're struggling with language or depression or university. It's also important to note that like, our sessions are open to anybody, like you don't have to have a specific diagnosis or have like anxiety or depression. They're essentially just a non judgmental, confidential space to share your thoughts and feelings, and help share strategies about how to overcome certain difficulties you might have at university. And so at the moment, we're running a five week cycle online nzme they normally they are in person. So say, Yeah, perfect. Thank you, Ellie. And last, but certainly not least, Liam. Joe talk about nightline? Absolutely. So we are a listing service run by and for students. At the moment, we are calling it open only on emails in our new nightline remote. And the idea is you can email in on us and talk about absolutely anything. It can be about having a bad day, having a good day, you might not be feeling great. You might be feeling amazingly, it doesn't matter. We're here to listen to you. And whatever you want to talk about. We will be here. I email services available 24 seven. And when hopefully University open soon, we'll be back open in calls and instant messaging. And you can see our Instagram and the Students Union website for more details. So please get in touch. We're happy to listen. Right Well, thank you very much, guys. It's been amazing to have you these are amazing support service volunteers. And yeah, Look after yourselves everyone and best of luck the results by that's everything this week from your sabs. Join us on Instagram and Facebook where you can see what's happening until next week's edition. If you want to get in touch Find us on Microsoft Teams, Instagram or email us on sorry 365